Developing Real Solutions For Real Issues...

epical – calcium supplement

$ 14.99$ 27.00

3.00 out of 5

EpiCal is Calcium Amino acid Complex offering a unique formula to provide un-paralleled bio-availability, absorption and bone utilization. EpiCal calcium supplement is a complex of Levoarginine, Glutamic Acid and Calcium combined with Herbal Epimedium and Vitamin D to maximize beneficial, verifiable results.

Clear
SKU: epi Categories: ,

Calcium supplementation is clearly important especially for women and for an aging population of either gender. A dependable and absorbable form of calcium is especially important to prevent calcium loss from bone, bone weakness and osteoporosis as a person ages.
EpiCal calcium supplement contains Calcium combined in an easily absorbed form with the natural amino-acids Levoarginine and Glutamic acid. It also contains Epimedium which has been shown to promote both absorption and utilization of Calcium by bone.
Research strongly suggests that Epimedium and Levoarginine stimulate cellular activity in bone to encourage new bone growth and promote vascular health as well. The scientific work suggest the unique combination may improve absorption, improve osteoclastic function, down regulate osteoblastic function and improve somatotropin balance with benefits to bone and vascular tissue. While there are many studies, positive laboratory results and much supportive evidence to strongly recommend this approach to calcium supplementation, there are however no clinical trials to support these functions therefore, we do not claim to accomplish these objectives. Nevertheless because of the safety and ubiquity of these substances in human metabolism and nutrition, this is clearly a safe direction.
EpiCal is not a simple mixture but is a true Calcium Aminoacid Complex which along with Vitamin D and Epimedium greatly improves it true Bioavailability and utilization. Put simply, this form of Calcium is absorbed very easily whereas it is widely recognized that most Calcium is absorbed poorly especially by older women. Also the use of Epimedium along with Vitamin D not only improves absorption but also utilization in bone metabolism to produce healthy mineralization and bone structure.

Select Dose

30, 60

Ingredients

Calcium Carbonate, Epimedium, Levoarginine, Glutamic Acid, Vitamin D (other ingredients): Binders and Tableting Agents

Warnings and Cautions

Calcium supplementation is generally regarded as safe. Do not take if you have chronic kidney failure except under the direction of a Medical Doctor. Do not take if you have a medical condition that produces high serum levels of calcium. Do not take if you have a known allergy to Epimedium.

Absorption

Excellent absorption. Food slows but does not block absorption by the Gastrointestinal Tract.

Drug Interaction

Calcium may interfere with the absorption of antibiotics and some medicines; separate taking these medicines from EpiCal or any other Calcium product by at least 1 hour. If in doubt consult your Doctor regarding Calcium Supplementation interfering with a specific medication.

1 review for epical – calcium supplement


  1. 3 out of 5

    :

    Glad I’ve finally found sotmehing I agree with!

Add a review

If you have been diagnosed with known osteoporosis you should be under the care of a physician. You should be having your bone density determined at recommended intervals. Is so, you have a bone density profile established. Changes in your profile will be verifiable after extended use of EpiCal. EpiCal may be safely taken with prescription medicines and may actually improve the absorption of other dietary sources of Calcium

L. Sànchez-Riera, N. Wilson, N. Kamalaraj et al., “Osteoporosis and fragility fractures,” Best Practice and Research, vol. 24, no. 6, pp. 793–810, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
K. Roush, “Prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: a review,” American Journal of Nursing, vol. 111, no. 8, pp. 26–35, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
P. P. Lelovas, T. T. Xanthos, S. E. Thorma, G. P. Lyritis, and I. A. Dontas, “The laboratory rat as an animal model for osteoporosis research,” Comparative Medicine, vol. 58, no. 5, pp. 424–430, 2008. View at Scopus
C. E. Bowring and R. M. Francis, “National Osteoporosis Society’s Position Statement on hormone replacement therapy in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis,” Menopause International, vol. 17, no. 2, pp. 63–65, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
S. Palacios, “Advances in hormone replacement therapy: making the menopause manageable,” BMC Women’s Health, vol. 8, article 22, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
M. Jiang, C. Zhang, H. Cao, K. Chan, and A. Lu, “The role of Chinese medicine in the treatment of chronic diseases in China,” Planta Medica, vol. 77, no. 9, pp. 873–881, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
S. Peng, G. Zhang, Y. He, et al., “Epimedium-derived flavonoids promote osteoblastogenesis and suppress adipogenesis in bone marrow stromal cells while exerting an anabolic effect on osteoporotic bone,” Bone, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 534–544, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
G. Zhang, L. Qin, W. Y. Hung et al., “Flavonoids derived from herbal epimedium brevicornum maxim prevent OVX-induced osteoporosis in rats independent of its enhancement in intestinal calcium absorption,” Bone, vol. 38, no. 6, pp. 818–825, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
W. F. Chen, S. K. Mok, X. L. Wang et al., “Total flavonoid fraction of the Herba epimedii extract suppresses urinary calcium excretion and improves bone properties in ovariectomised mice,” British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 105, no. 2, pp. 180–189, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
F. Xie, C. F. Wu, W. P. Lai et al., “The osteoprotective effect of Herba epimedii (HEP) extract in vivo and in vitro,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2, no. 3, pp. 353–361, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
H. Nian, M. H. Ma, S. S. Nian, and L. L. Xu, “Antiosteoporotic activity of icariin in ovariectomized rats,” Phytomedicine, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 320–326, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
Q. Bian, J. H. Huang, S. F. Liu, et al., “Different molecular targets of Icariin on bMSCs in CORT and OVX -rats,” Frontiers in Bioscience, vol. 4, pp. 1224–1236, 2012.
N. E. Lane, W. Yao, J. H. Kinney, G. Modin, M. Balooch, and T. J. Wronski, “Both hPTH(1–34) and bFGF increase trabecular bone mass in osteopenic rats but they have different effects on trabecular bone architecture,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 18, no. 12, pp. 2105–2115, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
S. Hidaka, Y. Okamoto, Y. Yamada, Y. Kon, and T. Kimura, “A Japanese herbal medicine, Chujo-to, has a beneficial effect on osteoporosis in rats,” Phytotherapy Research, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 14–19, 1999.
F. Deyhim, B. J. Stoecker, G. H. Brusewitz, L. Devareddy, and B. H. Arjmandi, “Dried plum reverses bone loss in an osteopenic rat model of osteoporosis,” Menopause, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 755–762, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
A. M. Parfitt, M. K. Drezner, F. H. Glorieux et al., “Bone histomorphometry: standardization of nomenclature, symbols, and units. Report of the ASBMR histomorphometry nomenclature committee,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 2, no. 6, pp. 595–610, 1987. View at Scopus
B. F. Boyce and L. Xing, “Functions of RANKL/RANK/OPG in bone modeling and remodeling,” Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 473, no. 2, pp. 139–146, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
Y. Kobayashi, N. Udagawa, and N. Takahashi, “Action of RANKL and OPG for osteoclastogenesis,” Critical Reviews in Eukaryotic Gene Expression, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 61–72, 2009. View at Scopus
M. R. McClung, E. M. Lewiecki, S. B. Cohen et al., “Denosumab in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 354, no. 8, pp. 821–831, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
B. Chong, M. Hegde, M. Fawknier et al., “Idiopathic hyperphosphatasia and TNFRSF11B mutations: relationships between phenotype and genotype,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 18, no. 12, pp. 2095–2104, 2003. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
M. P. Whyte, S. E. Obrecht, P. M. Finnegan et al., “Osteoprotegerin deficiency and juvenile Paget’s disease,” The New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 347, no. 3, pp. 175–184, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
F. J. A. D. Paula and C. J. Rosen, “Back to the future: revisiting parathyroid hormone and calcitonin control of bone remodeling,” Hormone and Metabolic Research, vol. 42, no. 5, pp. 299–306, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
D. Von Stechow, D. Zurakowski, A. R. Pettit et al., “Differential transcriptional effects of PTH and estrogen during anabolic bone formation,” Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 93, no. 3, pp. 476–490, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
C. E. Jacome-Galarza, S. K. Lee, J. A. Lorenzo, and H. L. Aguila, “Parathyroid hormone regulates the distribution and osteoclastogenic potential of hematopoietic progenitors in the bone marrow,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 1207–1216, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
J. C. Huang, T. Sakata, L. L. Pfleger et al., “PTH differentially regulates expression of RANKL and OPG,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 19, no. 2, pp. 235–244, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
S. Morony, C. Capparelli, R. Lee et al., “A chimeric form of osteoprotegerin inhibits hypercalcemia and bone resorption induced by IL-1β, TNF-α, PTH, PTHrP, and 1,25(OH)2D3,” Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 14, no. 9, pp. 1478–1485, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
D. Naot and J. Cornish, “The role of peptides and receptors of the calcitonin family in the regulation of bone metabolism,” Bone, vol. 43, no. 5, pp. 813–818, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
P. H. Carter and E. Schipani, “The roles of parathyroid hormone and calcitonin in bone remodeling: prospects for novel therapeutics,” Endocrine, Metabolic and Immune Disorders, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 59–76, 2006. View at Scopus
S. R. Schulz and H. A. Morris, “Ionized calcium and bone turnover in the estrogen-deficient rat,” Calcified Tissue International, vol. 65, no. 1, pp. 78–82, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
U. H. Lerner, “Bone remodeling in post-menopausal osteoporosis,” Journal of Dental Research, vol. 85, no. 7, pp. 584–595, 2006. View at Scopus
T. Hertrampf, B. Schleipen, M. Velders, U. Laudenbach, K. H. Fritzemeier, and P. Diel, “Estrogen receptor subtype-specific effects on markers of bone homeostasis,” Molecular and Cellular
Endocrinology, vol. 291, no. 1-2, pp. 104–108, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
Y. M. Lee, N. Fujikado, H. Manaka, H. Yasuda, and Y. Iwakura, “IL-1 plays an important role in the bone metabolism under physiological conditions,” International Immunology, vol. 22, no. 10, pp. 805– 816, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
J. A. Lorenzo, A. Naprta, Y. Rao et al., “Mice lacking the type I interleukin-1 receptor do not lose bone mass after ovariectomy,” Endocrinology, vol. 139, no. 6, pp. 3022–3025, 1998. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
H. Kitamura, H. Kawata, F. Takahashi, Y. Higuchi, T. Furuichi, and H. Ohkawa, “Bone marrow neutrophilia and suppressed bone turnover in human interleukin-6 transgenic mice: a cellular relationship among hematopoietic cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts mediated by stromal cells in bone marrow,” American Journal of Pathology, vol. 147, no. 6, pp. 1682–1692, 1995.
Alba-Roth J, Müller O, Schopohl J, von Werder K (1988). “Arginine stimulates growth hormone secretion by suppressing endogenous somatostatin secretion”. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 67 (6): 1186–9.